Dr Natassia Goode

_MG_9505

Research Fellow in Human Factors and Safety

Organisational Safety Theme Leader

Contact: ngoode@usc.edu.au

Natassia holds a Research Fellowship with the Centre for Human Factors and Sociotechnical Systems. Natassia’s research is concerned with applying systems thinking approaches to fundamentally change the way that organisations manage safety, and reduce accidents.

Natassia has over ten years’ experience in applied and experimental research in domains including outdoor education and recreation, workplace safety, healthcare, defence, road transport and emergency management. Her honours and PhD research in Psychology at the University of Sydney was concerned with how people learn to solve problems in complex, dynamic and uncertain environments.

Natassia’s research interests include:

  • Accident analysis, incident reporting and investigation
  • Optimising organisational learning from incidents
  • Translating human factors methods into useable tools for practitioners

Selected publications (see publications page for full list)

Goode, N., Salmon, P., Lenné, M., & Hillard, P. (2014). Systems thinking applied to safety during manual handling tasks in the transport and storage industry. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 68:181–191.

Goode, N., Salmon, P.M., Lenne, M.G. & Finch, C. (In Press). The UPLOADS Project: Challenges in implementing an Australia-wide incident reporting system for led outdoor activity providers. Wilderness and Environmental Medicine, Accepted 1st May 2015.

Salmon, P.M., Goode, N., Lenné, M. G., Cassell, E., Finch, C. (2014). Injury causation in the great outdoors: a systems analysis of led outdoor activity injury incidents. Accident Analysis and Prevention. 63, 111-120.

Newnam, S. & Goode, N. (2015). Don’t blame the driver: A systems analysis of the causes of road freight crashes. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 76, 141–151.

Goode, N., Salmon, P.M. & Lenne, M.G. (2013). Simulation-based driver and vehicle crew training: applications, efficacy and future directions. Applied Ergonomics, 44(3), 435-444.