Call for papers – Sociotechnical Systems Thinking in the Manufacturing and Service Industries

Special issue of the Journal of Human Factors in Manufacturing and Service Industries on Sociotechnical Systems Thinking Sociotechnical systems theory emerged in the 1950s from a program of research that focussed on the disruptive impacts of new technologies on human work (Eason, 2014; Trist & Bamforth, 1951). Primarily a work design theory, sociotechnical systems is … More Call for papers – Sociotechnical Systems Thinking in the Manufacturing and Service Industries

The redistribution of situation awareness: are we going too far?

As technologies become more sophisticated, the onus for storing and communicating the information we need to complete work and everyday tasks is increasingly being placed on them. This reliance on artefacts in the world for critical information is nothing new – indeed it formed the basis for popular Human Factors theories such as Distributed Cognition, … More The redistribution of situation awareness: are we going too far?

Engineering victory: systems ergonomics in sport

Researchers from the Centre’s Sport and Outdoor Recreation theme were recently invited by the Chartered Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors to write an article for their Ergonomist magazine to showcase some of our sports ergonomics research. The article was published in the May-June edition (with thanks to Tina Worthy for all of her help and … More Engineering victory: systems ergonomics in sport

What difference does complexity make in the outdoors?

Tony Carden, PhD candidate In our recently published paper, we argued that recognition of the led outdoor activity system as complex has implications for how outdoor programs should be regulated, managed, designed, supervised and led. What could that look like in practice? For starters, I want to suggest that complex doesn’t mean difficult. Nor does … More What difference does complexity make in the outdoors?